Bread and Better

Bread and Better

Friday, 31 October 2014

Beetroot, Beer and Camembert Flatbread

I have been using different beers in my bread for a while now. I think the liquor adds an intense flavour and a malty twist to my bakes. Beetroots are in season at the moment and I think this recipe is a great way to combine the two. This flatbread is a delicious addition to any meal or  served on its own as a tasty snack.



You will need:

300g of strong bread flour
7g of dried yeast
1 teaspoon of salt
2 tablespoons of olive oil
about 150ml beer (the exact amount will depend on your flour)

150g of camembert, cut into slices or chunks
1 teaspoon of dried chilli flakes
1 sprig of rosemary
2 small beetroots thinly sliced (I used a variety that the american's call 'chioggia' which is pink and stripy. You could also use golden or any cooked beetroot you fancy)


Rub the yeast into the flour and then add the salt to the opposite side of the bowl.
Add in the oil and the beer (you may need a little more, or a little less so add it slowly) and mix to form a smooth dough.
Knead for a few minutes until soft and elastic.
Cover with cling film or a tea towel or a shower cap and leave to prove for about an hour.

Whilst it proves, lightly oil a baking tray and pre heat the oven to about 200 degrees C.
Spread the dough onto the baking tray, with your hands, until it pretty much reaches the edges.
Cover with your toppings and leave to rest for 5 minutes.
Bake in the oven for around 15 minutes (you are looking for the edges to be golden and hard), remove from the tray and serve.


For a twist you could add goats cheese instead of camembert and even red onions too.

Thursday, 23 October 2014

Malted Wholemeal Spelt Loaf

As winter closes in, I crave a darker, more flavoursome loaf, to enjoy toasted or dunked into a steaming hot bowl of soup on a cold night.






To make the loaf you will need:

400g of wholemeal spelt flour
2 tablespoons of malt flour (I have used Flour Bin's medium malt)
7g of dried yeast
1 teaspoon of salt 
2 tablespoons of olive oil
about 300ml of water (straight from the tap will do)


Rub the yeast into the flours and the add the salt to the opposite side of the bowl.
Add the oil and most of the water (how much you will need will depend on your flour).
Knead to form a smooth dough (spelt doesn't need working as much as normal wheat flour, so a couple of minutes will do).
Cover with clingfilm or a tea towel (I actually use a shower cap) and leave to prove for about an hour, or until nearly doubled in size.

When risen, shape into a tight ball and leave to prove again, until nearly doubled in size.

Preheat the oven to about 200 degrees c and slash a cross (or any shape you like) onto the top of the loaf.

Bake for around twenty minutes or until it sounds hollow when you tap in on the base.

Great toasted with peanut butter.



Can be wizzed up in a processor with some sea salt and rosemary to make bread crumbs if you find you have any left that has gone stale. 

Lady Grey Tea Bread

This is my twist on the classic tea-time treat. I have turned this traditional cake into a fruity loaf with a zesty edge. Perfect toasted on a cold afternoon, with a lick of butter.





To make the loaf you will need:


300g of strong white flour
1 teaspoon of mixed spice
7g of dried yeast
1 teaspoon of salt
2 tablespoons of rapeseed oil
150g of sultanas
2-3 lady grey tea bags

1 small loaf tin


Soak the lady grey tea bags in about 300ml of boiling water and leave to cool.
Rub the yeast into the flour and add the salt to the opposite side of the bowl.
Add the oil, mixed spice and sultanas to the flour mix.
Add the cooled tea mixture (take the tea bags out) slowly (you will not need all of the water, probably only about 200ml of it, but it will depend on your flour), mixing until you have the right consistency (should be not dry but not too wet and sticky).
Knead for about 5 minutes.
Leave to prove for about an hour, or until it has nearly doubled in size.

Whilst the dough is proving, prepare your loaf tin by greasing it with butter.
Once the loaf has risen, shape it into a small rectangle and slide it into the tin.
Leave to prove again, until it has nearly doubled in size.

Preheat the oven to about 200 degrees c.
When the loaf is ready, bake for about twenty minutes (or until it comes easily out of the tin and has a hollow sound when tapped on the bottom).
Leave to cool and serve!


This loaf is great for making french toast or bread and butter pudding if you find you have any left that's gone a bit stale.